NEWLEAF TRAVEL TAKES FLIGHT

About Winnipeg, Manitoba

NEWLEAF TRAVEL TAKES FLIGHT

NewLeaf Travel, Canada's new low-cost travel company, operated its inaugural passenger flights to Kelowna and Hamilton from Winnipeg Richardson International Airport on July 25. NewLeaf expects to ‘soon’ operate 12 times weekly from Winnipeg, flying to Hamilton and Kelowna as well as Abbotsford, Victoria and Edmonton.

Headquartered in Winnipeg, NewLeaf Travel will operate from 11 Canadian cities: Halifax, Moncton, Hamilton, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Kelowna, Kamloops, Abbotsford and Victoria.
Flights booked through NewLeaf will be operated by Flair Airlines, a Canadian airline flying Boeing 737‐400 passenger jets. In March 2016, the Canadian Transportation Agency's review of licensing regulations determined that as a reseller of air services, NewLeaf Travel Company is not required to hold an airline license.

Terms, conditions and restrictions apply; pricing, availability, and other details subject to change and/ or apply to US or Canadian residents. Please confirm details and booking information with your travel advisor.

You will visit the following 8 places:

Kelowna

Kelowna

Kelowna is a city in the south of Canada’s British Columbia province. Serves as the head office of the Regional District of Central Okanagan, its name derives from an Okanagan language term for "grizzly bear". It’s in the Okanagan Valley, on the eastern shore of Okanagan Lake, surrounded by provincial parks, pine forest, vineyards, orchards and mountains.

Abbotsford

Abbotsford

Abbotsford is a Canadian city located in the Fraser Valley of British Columbia, adjacent to Greater Vancouver. It is the 5th largest municipality in British Columbia, home to 123,864 people (2006). Its Census Metropolitan Area, which includes the District of Mission to Abbotsford's north, is the 23rd largest in Canada, with 159,020 people (2006). Abbotsford has the 3rd highest proportion of visible minorities among Census Metropolitan Areas in Canada, after the Greater Toronto Area and Metro Vancouver. 

Saskatoon

Saskatoon

Saskatoon is the largest city in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. Straddling a bend in the South Saskatchewan River and located along the Trans-Canada Yellowhead Highway, it is centrally located in the province and has served as the cultural and economic hub of the region since its establishment in 1882 as a Temperance colony. The city is home to the University of Saskatchewan, the Meewasin Valley Authority which protects the South Saskatchewan River and provides for the city's popular riverbank park spaces, and Wanuskewin Heritage Park, a National Historic Site of Canada representing nearly 6,000 years of First Nations history. There is a significant Indigenous population in the city, and several urban Reserves within its boundaries. It is known for its relatively diverse and vibrant culture, as well as its eight (plus two planned) river crossings, earning it the nicknames"Paris of the Prairies" and "Bridge City." Historic neighbourhoods of Saskatoon include Nutana and Riversdale, which were both separate towns before amalgamating with the town of Saskatoon and incorporating as a city in 1906. Nutana, Riversdale, their historic main streets of Broadway Avenue and 20th Street respectively, as well as the downtown core and other central neighbourhoods, are seeing significant reinvestment and redevelopment today. Similarly, the old rail town of Sutherland was annexed by the city in 1956 and is now another historic neighbourhood of Saskatoon, just beyond the University lands.

Victoria

Victoria

Victoria, capital of British Columbia, is located near the southern tip of Vancouver Island. With abundant parkland, it’s known for outdoor activities. Named after Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom and, at the time, British North America, Victoria is one of the oldest cities in the Pacific Northwest, with British settlement beginning in 1843. Known as the "The Garden City", Victoria is also an attractive city and a popular tourism destination with a thriving technology sector that has risen to be its largest revenue-generating private industry.

Hamilton

Hamilton

Hamilton is a port city in the Canadian province of Ontario. Conceived by George Hamilton when he purchased the Durand farm shortly after the War of 1812, Hamilton has become the centre of a densely populated and industrialized region at the west end of Lake Ontario known as the Golden Horseshoe. Residents of the old city are known as Hamiltonians. The city is home to the Royal Botanical Gardens, the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, the Bruce Trail, McMaster University and Mohawk College. McMaster University is ranked 4th in Canada and 94th in the world and has a well-known medical school. A growing arts and culture community, the city is Canada's largest steel producer and a major Great Lakes port.

Regina

Regina

Regina is the capital of Saskatchewan, Canada. The city is the second largest in the province, and is a cultural and commercial metropole for southern Saskatchewan. Regina is Canada's 18th-largest metropolitan area by population. Its summer agricultural exhibition was originally established in 1884 as the Assiniboia Agricultural Association and since the mid-1960s has been styled "Buffalo Days". It is governed by Regina City Council. Regina is the cathedral city of the Roman Catholic and Romanian Orthodox Dioceses of Regina and the Anglican Diocese of Qu'Appelle. Citizens of Regina are referred to as Reginans. 

Kamloops

Kamloops

Kamloops is a city in south central British Columbia, Canada, at the confluence of the two branches of the Thompson River and near Kamloops Lake. It is the Tournament Capital of Canada. It has hosted Strauss Canada Cup of Curling, Skate Canada, World Fly Fishing Championships, Tim Horton's Olympic Qualifying Bike Race, and World Junior Hockey Championships. Kamloops has a population of just under 93,000, but is very spread out along two rivers, giving it the impression of being a much larger city.

Edmonton

Edmonton

Edmonton is the capital of Alberta, Canada. Edmonton's historic growth has been facilitated through the absorption of five adjacent urban municipalities (Strathcona, North Edmonton, West Edmonton, Beverly and Jasper Place) and a series of annexations ending in 1982. The city serves as the northern anchor of the Calgary–Edmonton Corridor. Known as the "Gateway to the North", the city is a staging point for large-scale oil sands projects occurring in northern Alberta and large-scale diamond mining operations in the Northwest Territories. Edmonton is a cultural, governmental and educational centre. It hosts a year-round slate of festivals, reflected in the nickname "Canada's Festival City". It is home to North America's largest mall, West Edmonton Mall (the world's largest mall from 1981 until 2004), and Fort Edmonton Park, Canada's largest living history museum.

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