Canada Flights - One way specials - Flights from $111

Canada Flights - One way specials - Flights from $111

Canada

One-way*

$223 CAD"> Save Calgary as a favorite destination Calgary

Canada

$223

Save Charlottetown as a favorite destination Charlottetown

Canada

$181

Save Deer Lake as a favorite destination Deer Lake

Canada

$180

Save Edmonton as a favorite destination Edmonton

Canada

$223

Save Fort McMurray as a favorite destination Fort McMurray

Canada

$220

Save Fredericton as a favorite destination Fredericton

Canada

$135

Save Gander as a favorite destination Gander

Canada

$178

Save Grande Prairie as a favorite destination Grande Prairie

Canada

$255

Save Halifax as a favorite destination Halifax

Canada

$181

Save Kamloops as a favorite destination Kamloops

Canada

$257

Save Kelowna as a favorite destination Kelowna

Canada

$239

Save Moncton as a favorite destination Moncton

Canada

$141

Save Nanaimo as a favorite destination Nanaimo

Canada

$283

Save Prince George as a favorite destination Prince George

Canada

$267

Save Quebec City as a favorite destination Quebec City

Canada

$129

Save Regina as a favorite destination Regina

Canada

$227

Save Saint John as a favorite destination Saint John

Canada

$141

Save Saskatoon as a favorite destination Saskatoon

Canada

$207

Save Sault Ste Marie as a favorite destination Sault Ste Marie

Canada

$134

Save St. John's as a favorite destination St. John's

Canada

$202

Save Sudbury as a favorite destination Sudbury

Canada

$102

Save Sydney as a favorite destination Sydney

Canada

$176

Save Thunder Bay as a favorite destination Thunder Bay

Canada

$136

Save Timmins as a favorite destination Timmins

Canada

$134

Save Vancouver as a favorite destination Vancouver

Canada

$251

Save Victoria as a favorite destination Victoria

Canada

$287

Save Windsor as a favorite destination Windsor

Canada

$111

Save Winnipeg as a favorite destination Winnipeg

Canada

$200


Terms, conditions and restrictions apply; pricing, availability, and other details subject to change and/ or apply to US or Canadian residents. Please confirm details and booking information with your travel advisor.

You will visit the following 27 places:

Saskatoon

Saskatoon

Saskatoon is the largest city in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan. Straddling a bend in the South Saskatchewan River and located along the Trans-Canada Yellowhead Highway, it is centrally located in the province and has served as the cultural and economic hub of the region since its establishment in 1882 as a Temperance colony. The city is home to the University of Saskatchewan, the Meewasin Valley Authority which protects the South Saskatchewan River and provides for the city's popular riverbank park spaces, and Wanuskewin Heritage Park, a National Historic Site of Canada representing nearly 6,000 years of First Nations history. There is a significant Indigenous population in the city, and several urban Reserves within its boundaries. It is known for its relatively diverse and vibrant culture, as well as its eight (plus two planned) river crossings, earning it the nicknames"Paris of the Prairies" and "Bridge City." Historic neighbourhoods of Saskatoon include Nutana and Riversdale, which were both separate towns before amalgamating with the town of Saskatoon and incorporating as a city in 1906. Nutana, Riversdale, their historic main streets of Broadway Avenue and 20th Street respectively, as well as the downtown core and other central neighbourhoods, are seeing significant reinvestment and redevelopment today. Similarly, the old rail town of Sutherland was annexed by the city in 1956 and is now another historic neighbourhood of Saskatoon, just beyond the University lands.

Timmins

Timmins

Timmins is a city in northeastern Ontario, Canada on the Mattagami River. At the time of the Canada 2011 Census, its population was 43,165. The city's economy is based on natural resource extraction and is supported by industries related to lumbering and to the mining of gold, zinc, copper, nickel, and silver. As the fourth-largest city in the Northeastern Ontario region, Timmins also serves as a regional service and distribution centre. The city has a large Francophone community, with more than 50 percent bilingual in French.

Greater Sudbury

Greater Sudbury

Greater Sudbury is a city in [Ontario](/search?q=ontario "Ontario"), [Canada](/search?q=canada "Canada"). Greater Sudbury was created in 2001 by merging the cities and towns of the former Regional Municipality of Sudbury, along with several previously unincorporated geographic townships. It is the largest city in the Northern [Ontario](/search?q=ontario "Ontario") region by population, and the 24th largest metropolitan area in Canada. By land area, it is the largest city in [Ontario](/search?q=ontario "Ontario"), and the seventh largest municipality by area in [Canada](/search?q=canada "Canada"). $$http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0v3gWbIFMk$$

Saint John

Saint John

Saint John is the largest city in New Brunswick and the second largest city in the Maritime provinces. It is known as the Fundy City due to its location on the north shore of the Bay of Fundy at the mouth of the Saint John River, as well as being the only city on the bay. In 1785, Saint John became the first incorporated city in Canada.

Winnipeg

Winnipeg

Winnipeg is the capital and largest city of the province of Manitoba in Canada. It is located near the longitudinal centre of North America, at the confluence of the Red and Assiniboine Rivers. Being located very far inland, the city is named after the nearby Lake Winnipeg; the name comes from the Western Cree words for muddy or brackish water.  Known as the "Gateway to the West", Winnipeg is a railway and transportation hub with a diversified economy. This multicultural city hosts numerous annual festivals, including the Festival du Voyageur, the Winnipeg Folk Festival, the Jazz Winnipeg Festival, the Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival, and Folklorama. Winnipeg was the first Canadian host of the Pan American Games. It is home to several professional sports franchises, including the Winnipeg Blue Bombers (Canadian football), theWinnipeg Jets (ice hockey), Manitoba Moose (ice hockey) and the Winnipeg Goldeyes (baseball).

Fredericton

Fredericton

Fredericton is the capital of the Canadian province of New Brunswick, by virtue of the provincial parliament which sits there. An important cultural, artistic, and educational centre for the province, Fredericton is home to two universities and cultural institutions such as the Beaverbrook Art Gallery, the York Sunbury Museum, and The Playhouse—a performing arts venue. The city hosts the annual Harvest Jazz & Blues Festival, attracting regional and international jazz, blues, rock, and world artists. Fredericton is also known for its indie rock scene, featuring jamband-reminiscent artists like Grand Theft Bus, and the record label Forward Music Group.

Vancouver

Vancouver

Vancouver is a coastal city located in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada. It is one of the most ethnically and linguistically diverse cities in Canada; 52% of its residents have a first language other than English. Classed as a Beta global city, the city is well known for its majestic natural beauty, as it is nestled between the Coast Mountains and the Pacific Ocean. It is frequently ranked as one of the "best cities to live in" and is certainly a beautiful destination to visit.

Sydney, Nova Scotia

Sydney, Nova Scotia

Sydney is a Canadian urban community in the province of Nova Scotia. It is situated on the east coast of Cape Breton Island and is administratively part of the Cape Breton Regional Municipality. Sydney was incorporated in 1904 and dissolved on August 1, 1995, when it was merged into the regional municipality. It is the largest urban centre on Cape Breton Island. Together with Sydney Mines, North Sydney, New Waterford and Glace Bay it forms the Industrial Cape Breton region. Sydney is located on east bank of the Sydney River where it discharges into South Arm of Sydney Harbour.

Halifax

Halifax

Halifax, legally known as the Halifax Regional Municipality (HRM), is the capital of the province of Nova Scotia, Canada. It is a major economic centre in Atlantic Canada with a large concentration of government services and private sector companies. Major employers and economic generators include the Department of National Defence, Dalhousie University,Saint Mary's University, the Halifax Shipyard, various levels of government, and the Port of Halifax. Agriculture, fishing, mining, forestry and natural gas extraction are major resource industries found in the rural areas of the municipality. Halifax was ranked as the fourth best place to live in Canada for 2012, placed first on a list of "large cities by quality of life" and placed second in a list of "large cities of the future''. Additionally, Halifax has consistently placed in the top 10 for business friendliness of North and South American cities. Waterfront warehouses known as the Historic Properties recall Halifax’s days as a trading hub for privateers, notably during the War of 1812.

Grande Prairie

Grande Prairie

Grande Prairie is a city in the northwestern part of the province of Alberta in Western Canada within the southern portion of an area known as Peace River Country. It is the seventh-largest city in Alberta with a population 55,032 recorded by the 2011 Census, and was one of Canada's fastest growing cities between 2001 and 2006. The city adopted the trumpeter swan as an official symbol due to its proximity to the migration route and summer nesting grounds of this bird. For that reason, Grande Prairie is sometimes nicknamed the "Swan City". The dinosaur has emerged as an unofficial symbol of the city due to paleontology discoveries in the areas north and west of the Grande Prairie.

St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador

St. John's is the capital and largest city in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. St. John's was incorporated as a city in 1888, yet is considered by some to be the oldest English-founded city in North America. Situated on the eastern tip of the Avalon Peninsula on the island of Newfoundland, it is one of the world's top ten oceanside destinations. Its name has been attributed to the feast day of John the Baptist, when John Cabot was believed to have sailed into the harbour in 1497, and also to a Basque fishing town with the same name.

Calgary

Calgary

Calgary is a city in the Canadian province of Alberta. It is situated at the confluence of the Bow River and the Elbow River in the south of the province, in an area of foothills and prairie, about 80 km (50 mi) east of the front ranges of the Canadian Rockies. In the 2011 census, the City of Calgary had a population of 1,096,833 and a metropolitan population of 1,214,839, making it the largest city in Alberta, and the third-largest municipality and fifth-largest census metropolitan area (CMA) in Canada. The economy of Calgary includes activity in the energy, financial services, film and television, transportation and logistics, technology, manufacturing, aerospace, health and wellness, retail, and tourism sectors. The Calgary CMA is home to the second-highest number of corporate head offices in Canada among the country's 800 largest corporations.

Windsor, Ontario

Windsor, Ontario

Windsor, Ontario is the southernmost city in Canada. It is located on the southern shore of the Detroit River, directly across the river from Detroit, Michigan. Windsor is a major contributor to Canada's automotive industry and has much to offer through its storied history and diverse culture.    

Thunder Bay

Thunder Bay

Thunder Bay (2006 census population 109,140), formerly the twin cities of Fort William and Port Arthur, is a city in and the seat of Thunder Bay District, Ontario, Canada. It is the most populous municipality in Northwestern Ontario, and the second most populous in Northern Ontario after Greater Sudbury. The census metropolitan area of Thunder Bay has a population of 122,907, and consists of the city of Thunder Bay, the municipalities of Oliver Paipoonge and Neebing, the townships of Shuniah, Conmee, O'Connor and Gillies and the Fort William First Nation. $$http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0pN1jsVVug$$

Victoria, British Columbia

Victoria, British Columbia

Victoria, capital of British Columbia, is located near the southern tip of Vancouver Island. With abundant parkland, it’s known for outdoor activities. Named after Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom and, at the time, British North America, Victoria is one of the oldest cities in the Pacific Northwest, with British settlement beginning in 1843. Known as the "The Garden City", Victoria is also an attractive city and a popular tourism destination with a thriving technology sector that has risen to be its largest revenue-generating private industry.

Prince George

Prince George

Prince George, with a population of 70,981, is the largest city in northern British Columbia, Canada, and is known as the "BC's Northern Capital". Situated at the confluence of the Fraser and Nechako Rivers, and the crossroads of Highway 16 and Highway 97, the city plays an important role in the province's economy and culture. The origins of Prince George can be traced to the North West Company fur trading post of Fort George, which was established in 1807 by Simon Fraser and named in honour of King George III. The post was centred in the centuries-old homeland of the Lheidli T'enneh First Nation, whose very name means "people of the confluence of the two rivers".

Regina

Regina

Regina is the capital of Saskatchewan, Canada. The city is the second largest in the province, and is a cultural and commercial metropole for southern Saskatchewan. Regina is Canada's 18th-largest metropolitan area by population. Its summer agricultural exhibition was originally established in 1884 as the Assiniboia Agricultural Association and since the mid-1960s has been styled "Buffalo Days". It is governed by Regina City Council. Regina is the cathedral city of the Roman Catholic and Romanian Orthodox Dioceses of Regina and the Anglican Diocese of Qu'Appelle. Citizens of Regina are referred to as Reginans. 

Charlottetown

Charlottetown

Charlottetown is a Canadian city. It is both the largest city on and the provincial capital of Prince Edward Island, and the county seat of Queens County. Named after Queen Charlotte, the wife of George III, Charlottetown was first incorporated as a town in 1855 and designated as a city in 1885. It was most famously the site of the Charlottetown Conference in 1864, the first gathering of Canadian statesmen to debate the proposed Canadian Confederation. From this, the city adopted as its motto  "Cunabula Foederis" – "Birthplace of Confederation".

Kamloops

Kamloops

Kamloops is a city in south central British Columbia, Canada, at the confluence of the two branches of the Thompson River and near Kamloops Lake. It is the Tournament Capital of Canada. It has hosted Strauss Canada Cup of Curling, Skate Canada, World Fly Fishing Championships, Tim Horton's Olympic Qualifying Bike Race, and World Junior Hockey Championships. Kamloops has a population of just under 93,000, but is very spread out along two rivers, giving it the impression of being a much larger city.

Quebec

Quebec

Canada's second most populous province, Quebec is also the only one to have a predominantly French-speaking population, with French as the sole provincial official language. Its historic capital, Québec City, celebrates one of the world's most brutal winters with a carnival that features parades of majorettes and teams who race boats across an ice-choked river. Quebec is unique among North American tourist destinations. Its French heritage does not only set the province apart from most of its English speaking neighbors, it is also one of the few historical areas in North America to have fully preserved its Francophone culture. Its European feel and its history, culture and warmth have made Quebec a favourite tourist destination both nationally and internationally.

Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario

Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario

Sault Ste. Marie is a city on the St. Marys River in Ontario, Canada, close to the US-Canada border. To the south, across the river, is the United States and the city of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. These two communities were one city until a new treaty after the War of 1812 established the border between Canada and the United States in this area at the St. Mary's River. In the 21st century, the two cities are joined by the International Bridge, which connects Interstate 75 on the Michigan side, and Huron Street (and former Ontario Secondary Highway 550B) on the Ontario side. Shipping traffic in the Great Lakes system bypasses the Saint Mary's Rapids via the American Soo Locks, the world's busiest canal in terms of tonnage that passes through it, while smaller recreational and tour boats use the Canadian Sault Ste. Marie Canal.

Moncton

Moncton

Moncton is a Canadian city located in Westmorland County, New Brunswick. The city is situated in southeastern New Brunswick, within the Petitcodiac River Valley, and lies at the geographic centre of the Maritime Provinces. The community has gained the nickname "Hub City" because of its central location and also because Moncton has historically been the railway and land transportation hub for the Maritime Provinces. Moncton, with a 2006 metropolitan population of 126,424, is the most populous census metropolitan area (CMA) in New Brunswick. It is the second largest CMA in the Maritime Provinces, after Halifax, and the third largest in the Atlantic Provinces following Halifax and St. John's. 

Edmonton

Edmonton

Edmonton is the capital of Alberta, Canada. Edmonton's historic growth has been facilitated through the absorption of five adjacent urban municipalities (Strathcona, North Edmonton, West Edmonton, Beverly and Jasper Place) and a series of annexations ending in 1982. The city serves as the northern anchor of the Calgary–Edmonton Corridor. Known as the "Gateway to the North", the city is a staging point for large-scale oil sands projects occurring in northern Alberta and large-scale diamond mining operations in the Northwest Territories. Edmonton is a cultural, governmental and educational centre. It hosts a year-round slate of festivals, reflected in the nickname "Canada's Festival City". It is home to North America's largest mall, West Edmonton Mall (the world's largest mall from 1981 until 2004), and Fort Edmonton Park, Canada's largest living history museum.

Fort McMurray

Fort McMurray

Fort McMurray is an urban service area in the Regional Municipality (RM) of Wood Buffalo in Alberta, Canada. It is located in northeast Alberta, in the middle of the Athabasca oil sands, surrounded by boreal forest. It has played a significant role in the development of the national petroleum industry. Formerly a city, Fort McMurray became an urban service area when it amalgamated with Improvement District No. 143 on April 1, 1995, to create the Municipality of Wood Buffalo (renamed the RM of Wood Buffalo on August 14, 1996). Despite its current official designation of urban service area, many locals, politicians and the media still refer to Fort McMurray as a city. Fort McMurray was known simply as McMurray between 1947 and 1962.

Nanaimo

Nanaimo

Nanaimo (Canada 2006 Census population 78,692) is a city on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. It has been dubbed the "Bathtub Racing Capital of the World" and "Harbour City". Nanaimo is also sometimes referred to as the "Hub City" because of its central location on Vancouver Island and due to the layout of the downtown streets which form a "hub" pattern. It is also fondly known as the "Hub, Tub, and Pub City" because of its association with the bathtub racing and the numerous "watering holes" in Old Nanaimo.

Deer Lake

Deer Lake

Gander

Gander

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